Press Conference on 30 Jan in response to British’s Reply

Britain says “No” to Batang Kali heirs

(Source: http://www.malaysiakini.com/news/97317)

Sixty years after the incident and a recent submission of a memorandum to Queen Elizabeth II and the British government, the Batang Kali massacre action committee described the official rejection of a public inquiry on the incident as “very dissapointing”. Continue reading

Press Statement on 30 Jan 2009

Press Statement

 

1.        Following the petitions submitted by the Action Committee Condemning the Batang Kali Massacre on both 25 March and 12 December 2008, the British High Commissioner, HE Boyd McCleary, being the representative of HM Queen Elizabeth II in Malaysia, has been directed to reply to the petitions on 21 January 2009.

 

2.        The British Government claims that they have carefully considered the petitions and concludes that “in view of the findings of 2 previous investigations that there was insufficient evidence to pursue prosecutions in this case, and in the absence of any new evidence, regrettable we see no reason to reopen or start a fresh investigation.” It is understood that the 2 previous investigation referred to the 1949 and the 1970 investigations.

 

3.        The Action Committee is disappointed and absolutely not convinced with the British Government reply because the latter has not taken into account the inherent unsatisfactory and incomplete nature of the previous 2 investigations. Instead, the British Government has taken into account an irrelevant consideration of pursuing criminal prosecution, which is not intended or demanded by the surviving families of the massacre. Continue reading

German Press Report on Batang Kali Massacre Petition

batang-kali-12-12-08

Courtesy of Alois Leinweber

Sixty years on, last witness to British massacre in Malaysia speaks out

Telegraph (15/12/2008) : The Asia File

by Ben Bland

The Batang Kali massacre, in which 24 unarmed Chinese villagers were gunned down by Scots Guards in extremely questionable circumstances at the height of the Malayan Emergency in 1948, has been largely forgotten in Britain. It has never attracted the level of coverage accorded to the American outrages carried out at My Lai, Vietnam in 1968 and Haditha, Iraq in 2005.

But, 60 years after the incident that occurred at Batang Kali village, near Kuala Lumpur, on December 11-12, the last surviving witness in Malaysia is once again repeating her call for justice.

77-year-old Tham Yong, who is dying of throat cancer, has spent decades fighting for a full public enquiry, an apology from the British government and compensation. She told AFP that “after so much time, it still hurts me every time I talk about it, I remember it just like yesterday”.

“I’m still angry because these were innocent persons but labelled as bandits and communists, when all they were doing was collecting durians and not supplying food to the communists,” she said. “My advanced cancer means I will not around much longer, but I hope people remember what happened here so that those who were killed here are never forgotten.”

A group of politicians and activists, which is continuing the campaign for justice, delivered a note to the British High Commission in Kuala Lumpur last week, calling on the British government to close the matter once and for all by holding a public enquiry. But the government has in the past always resisted such requests.

Like so many similar incidents, the exact details of what happened at the village of Batang Kali on those two days are clouded by the fog of war and remain sketchy. Perhaps the best recent account is contained in the excellent Forgotten Wars by Christopher Bayly and Tim Harper (who I studied under at university). Originally it was claimed that the men, who were rubber tappers suspected of helping supply communist insurgents, had been shot while trying to run away. Continue reading

Malaysia’s Last Witness to 1948 Massacre Calls for Justice

Protesters campaign in front of the British High Commission in Kuala Lumpur to condemn the historic Batang Kali massacre

Protesters campaign in front of the British High Commission in Kuala Lumpur to condemn the historic Batang Kali massacreCampaigners lay white flowers at the British High Commission in Kuala Lumpur to mark the historic Batang Kali massacre

 

Campaigners lay white flowers at the British High Commission in Kuala Lumpur to mark the historic Batang Kali massacre

Campaigners lay white flowers at the British High Commission in Kuala Lumpur to mark the historic Batang Kali massacre

BATANG KALI, Malaysia (AFP) — Tham Yong is elderly and infirm, but the sole living survivor of Malaysia’s 1948 Batang Kali massacre says she still vividly remembers what she calls “the day the British killed our men”.

“After so much time, it still hurts me every time I talk about it, I remember it just like yesterday,” she says, tears streaming down her cheeks as she recounts the slaying of 24 unarmed villagers by Scots Guards troops.

The 77-year-old former rubber tapper has spent decades fighting for compensation over the terrible events in the village of Batang Kali on December 11 and 12, 1948.

But as she succumbs to throat cancer, the campaign is being taken up by a new generation of activists and politicians who have demanded an apology from Britain and 80 million pounds (149 million dollars) in compensation.

The leader of the campaign, 40-year-old lawyer Quek Ngee Meng — whose father lives in Batang Kali — marched with a small band of supporters to the British High Commission on Friday to mark the 60th anniversary of the event.

The group presented a memorandum condemning the massacre to High Commissioner Boyd McCleary, who came out to the embassy gates to meet with the protesters.

“We are asking for a proper public enquiry to be held… I think it’s a fair request,” Quek told AFP.

“Let us show our evidence and if we have proven our case, then meet our demands. If the outcome favours the British government, then we will stop this protest,” he said. Continue reading

Petition handed to British envoy

New Straits Times ( 2008/12/13)

KUALA LUMPUR: A group of 100 people handed a petition calling for justice over the Batang Kali massacre to British High Commissioner Boyd McCleary, here yesterday. The Action Committee Condemning the Batang Kali Massacre head of signature, Quek Ngee Meng, said the petition was timed to coincide with the incident’s 60th anniversary yesterday.

“The petition is a follow-up to an earlier one we sent to the British High Commission on March 25, where no action was taken by the British government,” said Quek.

The group, consisting of families of the victims and members of several non-governmental organisations spent about half an hour outside the British High Commission in Jalan Ampang at 10.30am.

They were later met by McCleary who personally accepted their petition under the watchful eyes of some 100 Federal Reserve Unit officers. Continue reading

追讨英军屠杀罪行工委会 办大游行誓为受害者平反

在英国最高专员署前请愿,模仿英军手持头颅

在英国最高专员署前请愿,模仿英军手持头颅

 in front of british high comm

(吉隆坡12日讯)追讨英军屠杀罪行工委会星期五举办百人大游行,分成多个小组,从马华大厦步行至英国驻马最高专员署,以呈交备忘录给英女皇伊丽莎白二世,为60年前在乌鲁音被屠杀的24名平民平反!

  工委会希望通过英女皇施压,英国政府能正视这个问题,并成立独立公正的听证会来审理这起案件。他们也要求英国政府就当年英军残暴屠杀一事道歉,并赔偿给殉难者家属,以及建立殉难者纪念碑。

有证据证人
工委会义务律师团召集人郭义民律师指出,手头上有证据及目击证人,可证明当年那批被杀害的居民,都是手无寸铁的平民百姓,绝非英国政府宣称的恶匪。 Continue reading